How Long Do Bananas Last?

Bananas are a very healthy and delicious fruit. They contain loads of essential nutrients, both vitamins, and minerals, and they’re naturally protected by an outer skin, which gives them the nickname; “nature’s perfect food”. Bananas are commonly sold in various colors, from bright green to extremely yellow to brown-speckled skin, and various people have varied opinions on which stage is the ripest.

When it comes to bananas, how long do they last? It is difficult to tell how long they will last because bananas do not have a sell-by date, use-by date, use-by date, or best before date. We must use the date the bananas were purchased for consumption by date considerations.

Now, how long can you keep a banana? Bananas have a shelf life beyond their purchase date when properly stored. Fresh bananas last for 2-7 days at room temperature, 2-9 days in the refrigerator, and 3-6 months in the freezer. Note that this will be the case of fresh bananas that are purchased not long after harvest. To inquire about the state of the banana, it’s best to ask the store, that way you’ll know how long you can extend it for. 

How do you know when bananas go bad?

When bananas have gone bad, they will first develop brown patches, then become soft and squishy, turn brown, and leak liquid. They will eventually turn black and have molds if left out for too long. When bananas are harvested, they are usually sent to markets green because that way they have a better aroma, taste, and texture.

Note that when you place bananas near other fruits, they will ripen faster. 

Another issue with having fresh fruit on the counter is the unexpected appearance of fruit flies. Fruit flies are little flies that swarm around your fresh fruit basket. You can prevent fruit flies if you want to, all you have to do is pour a teaspoon of Apple cider vinegar into a bowl of water, and place next to the fruit basket. This will keep the flies away and you might even find your bowl of vinegar and water filled with dead flies, just throw out the content of the bowl and refill it. This way, you will practice food safety. 

Foodborne diseases are often avoided by following proper cleanliness and food safety procedures. These diseases have bad effects on a person’s health that’s why it’s important to practice food safety and eat fruits before their shelf lives expire or appropriately preserve them. 

How long do bananas last at room temperature?

Bananas are perishable fruits and it is expected that they have a short life span. However compared to the fruits in its category, bananas are quite better with room temperature life span. 

Bananas can last 2-7 days on the counter, and they ripen at room temperature, plus their lifespan has three important stages and all these stages can be eaten (depending on personal preference). When bananas are ripe, they are green, soft, and sweet, when they turn yellow, they are as sweet (can even be sweeter) and when they turn brown they are extremely soft and mushy, this way they can be used for baking banana bread or other banana related pantries. However, if there is any appearance of mold, then it can that section cannot be consumed. All these reasons are why bananas can be kept for up to a week at room temperature as compared to some fruits. 

In some cases, they may even last longer than a week. Plus the status of a banana may be tricky by looking at it from the outside, the nature of the inside is usually the determining factor of the banana’s condition.

How long do bananas last in the fridge?

Bananas last for about 2-7 days on the kitchen counter, which is remarkable. To increase this lifespan by a few days, you should keep bananas in the fridge. 

When bananas are in the refrigerator, they can last for about 2-10 days. 

Can bananas be frozen?

To keep your bananas longer, for months, you should learn how to freeze them. There are a few wonderful techniques for freezing bananas in a way that will make them the handiest to utilize in the future.

Although it’s going to be tempting to put a banana within the freezer with the skin on, doing so makes it difficult to use the banana since the peel is hard to remove when frozen. Bananas can be used right immediately if frozen properly. Fresh bananas should always be used. Within six months, frozen bananas will be at their peak.

Freezing whole bananas

Remove your banana peels and place them on a tray, then into the freezer until they are solid. Then replace them in a sealed paper bag and make sure to remove any excess air before closing.

Freezing banana slices

Remove your banana peels and cut them into small thick pieces. Pour them onto a tray and freeze till they are solid. Transfer them to a paper bag and remove excess air before sealing.

Freezing brown bananas

They should be peeled and mashed. Before putting them into plastic bags, you should measure them accurately; two bananas per bag will come in handy. Before sealing them remove any excess oxygen, if you have kept more than two bananas in a bag, make sure you indicate the numbers of bananas on the bag.

How long does it take to freeze bananas?

Bananas must be frozen for at least 3 hours in the freezer. If bananas aren’t solid yet, freeze them for a few hours minutes longer or even overnight.

How long do bananas last in the freezer?

Freezing bananas will keep them fresh for as long as months. You can freeze whole bananas, banana slices, and brown bananas for as long as 3-6 and above.

How long do bananas last in cold storage?

Bananas last longer in cold storage than at room temperature. In the fridge, bananas will last for 2-9 days, while they can last for up to 3-6 months in the freezer. The cold storage method surely pays a lot.

Best way to store bananas

Bananas are sweet and convenient to eat, and a couple of ripe bananas can be left on the kitchen counter for 2-7 days. Refrigeration will keep them for 2-9 days, and freezing can keep them for up to 6 months. The ideal storage method will be determined by the duration before consumption.

Simon
Simon

Writer at Foodexpired.com, love experiments and verifying facts.

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